Affectionately, the bride and groom touch each other's foreheads in the fog, by the wedding photographer in Portugal.

The surprises of the photographer, at the wedding

IN THE FOG by THE WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER 

Affectionately, the bride and groom touch each other's foreheads in the fog, by the wedding photographer in Portugal.

Lesson learned. When a client tells me, let’s go to a place I know to photograph our session, the wedding photographer must pick up the bag with all lenses inside to take advantage of all possibilities he can find. It is about this session. When it was time to go to photograph, with Katerina and David, I was challenged, and never crossed my mind what I was going to find.

The lens, available to the photographer, has its own role. For the couple sessions, I choose, always, two of them that I feel, because of the space conditions, will perform best for what I have in mind. That is how, when I was taken up the mountain to a very old half-abandoned monastery that, immediately to my eyes, was the best scenario possible for the session…and with fog, a lot.

If the wedding photographer was paralyzed when noticed that the lens he brought was not the best for that space? No way. It is with the plow we have that the land is plowed. But, I must consider, here and there, the wish of dropping walls was not needed, if that one, left behind in the bag, was with me. That is true. But those things are the salt that season the difficulties and, in the end, everything comes to the right place. One day, I will be back with all the lenses, yes I will…

In the photo shoot with the couple, they look at each other.
In the ruins of the Dominican Convent, the groom kisses the bride's hand.
Between a dilapidated doorway, the newlywed couple opposite each other.
Bride sitting on a ruined monastery wall, surrounded by fog.
The couple in the fog talk at the Ruins of the Dominican Convent.

This photos were taken at Ruins of Convento dos Dominicanos at Serra de Montejunto in Cadaval. The wedding was at Quinta do Castro in Pragança.

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